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PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo.

MHS pharmacies adapt services amid COVID-19

By Military Health System Communications Office | April 30, 2020
Pharmacies across the Military Health System are adapting their prescription services to protect high-risk patients and pharmacy customers and staff from COVID-19 exposure.

 

Senior Airman Brittany Campbell prepares urinalysis samples for testing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. James Hodgman)

Medical lab workers ensure readiness and wellness behind the scenes

By Military Health System Communications Office | April 24, 2020
Medical laboratory professionals usually work behind the scenes, performing vital duties to ensure the health and readiness of the force.

 

U.S. Air Force Maj. Melissa Legowski, nurse practitioner from the 99th Medical Group at Nellis Air Force Base, briefs Guyanese nurses during a lecture at the Linden Mackenzie Hospital during New Horizons exercise 2019 in Linden, Guyana, June 13, 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Derek Seifert)

A look into the future: Embedded Health Engagement Teams

By Zach Huebschman and Kelley Schlitt, U.S. Air Force International Health Specialist | April 22, 2020
FALLS CHURCH, Va. -- International Health Specialists from 12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) are piloting a new global health engagement model to improve health and readiness for U.S. military forces and partner nations.
 

Telework made necessary by the COVID-19 pandemic has increased internet reliance and heightened the need for safe cybersecurity practices. (Photo by Eric Pilgrim)

Cybersecurity critical for DoD teleworkers during pandemic

By Military Health System Communications Office | April 21, 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified the importance of balancing our continued commitment to the military healthcare mission with our own personal hygiene and well-being.

 

Students and instructors in the METC Respiratory Therapist program practice safe distancing and wear face coverings while training with mechanical ventilators. (Photo by Oscar Lopez)

Military Medical training continues during Covid-19

By Military Health System Communications Office | April 14, 2020
FORT SAM HOUSTON – While military and civilian health care workers around the globe do their part in the fight against COVID-19, the Medical Education and Training Campus (METC) is preparing the future enlisted medical force to provide critical support to these front-line providers.
 

Zekelia Rembert, virtual health nurse care coordinator, reviews patient photos using the virtual health cart at the Virtual Medical Center at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, May 10, 2019. The team at the Virtual Health Center at Brooke Army Medical Center and Regional Health Command - Central has been selected as the 2018 U.S. Army Medical Department Mercury Award winner for Health Information Technology Team of the Year. (U.S. Army photo by Jason W. Edwards)

Military hospital dials in virtual healthcare to combat COVID-19

By Lisa Braun, Medical Education and Training Campus Public Affairs | April 13, 2020
JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas, April 8, 2020 – Deb Deja’s follow-up visit with her provider at Brooke Army Medical Center was fast approaching when COVID-19 hit the news and the city.
 

Louisiana Air National Guardsmen sort medical supplies at Smoothie King Center in New Orleans, March 31, 2020, while supporting COVID-19 response efforts. Medical supplies were stored at the sports arena before being distributed to drive-thru community-based COVID-19 testing sites. (Photo By: Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Dan Farrell)

Guardsmen Remain Adaptable in Face of Coronavirus

By Jim Garamone, DoD New, Defense Media Activity | April 9, 2020
Air Force Gen. Joseph L. Lengyel and Army Brig. Gen. D. Keith Waddell, Louisiana's adjutant general, remotely briefed Pentagon reporters April 8 on the Guard's contribution to the fight.

 

 4/1/2020 By: Lt. Gen. Ron Place, Director, Defense Health AgencyShare this page Social Media Links Share on Facebook   Share on Twitter   Email this page Other Social Media Recommended Content:  Coronavirus Who would have imagined this? We’ve stopped almost everything else we were doing and turned our energies toward fighting this pandemic. As the specific impacts take shape within the United States, the Military Health System is surging forward, implementing standing plans and showing agility in responding to events that some believed were unthinkable even a few short months ago.  Federal and state officials are requesting military medical forces to assist in stemming the spread of infection both directly and indirectly. Hundreds of thousands of professionals who are supported by the relatively young Defense Health Agency are reinforcing our civilian medical capabilities. Just as we’ve done throughout our history, when the U.S. military is called in times of crisis and natural disaster, we answer.  Military medicine is providing assistance in unprecedented ways. Already, two hospital ships, the USNS Mercy and the USNS Comfort, are positioned in Los Angeles and New York City, respectively, providing much needed additional medical capability to civilian medical facilities overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients. The Army has also established field hospitals in New York and is increasing bed space elsewhere with the phenomenal work of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It’s the right thing to do, right now.  In the best of times, the primary mission of the Military Health System is to maintain a medically ready force and a ready medical force. This means we must ensure American Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen are medically ready to deploy anywhere, anytime to defend the Nation. It also means we must develop and sustain our own medical teams to be trained and ready to support the force. Shifting focus from this primary mission carries risk; however, after two decades of conflict, we are well prepared to both identify risk and develop strategies to mitigate it.  This is not theoretical. We’re taking actions with tangible effects. For instance, we are rapidly shifting as many physicians, nurses, and other medical professionals as we can from administrative duties to direct patient care. We’re plowing new ground by graduating new doctors and nurses months early from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, the military’s medical school, so they can join the fight – now. In our military hospitals and clinics, we’ve limited elective medical and dental procedures, so we can decrease surgical inpatient needs, shift clinical staffing toward COVID response, and conserve medical resources for the COVID fight.  Additionally, we’re identifying patient bed space on military installations and planning how to quickly convert – or return to use – unused space, with all of the needed equipment and supplies. That means, in some cases, converting office space once used as patient rooms when our military was twice the size, back to treatment areas. Fighting this pandemic is all-hands-on-deck. No good idea is off the table.  The reassuring news is that the Military Health System is, in some ways, uniquely suited for this crisis. Just as every Marine is a rifleman, every medical provider in our system is a generalist. While many of our health care providers normally do focus on specific diseases or specialties, they are trained to treat patients across the range of needs wherever they’re called to serve. Agility is part of what we offer our nation every day.  Facing multiple challenges is nothing new for us. Together, across the levels of government, we can do this. At this extraordinary time, we can play a significant part in caring for citizens in need, while still ensuring our military forces are medically ready to defend our Nation. With the support of the 9.5 million beneficiaries who depend on us for their health care, our agile and dedicated Defense health team is surging thousands of service members to the front lines, helping our fellow Americans, and meeting our obligation to the nation’s sons and daughters who have volunteered to defend them.  You also may be interested in... All (85) Articles (61) Publications (17) More » Videos (5) Technical Documents (1) Forms & Templates (1) DoD to honor nurses during National Nurses Week 2020 Article 5/6/2020 Image of an OR nurse with mask and protective suit National Nurses Week begins on National Nurses Day, May 6, and culminates May 12.  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | National Nurses Week Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor Honors Nurses during National Nurses Week Article 5/6/2020 Image of military nurses The MHS theme of 2020 National Nurses Week is “Integrating for Excellence.”  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | National Nurses Week DHA collaborates to further sequence the SARS-CoV-2 Code Article 5/6/2020 Image of person testing genomes in a lab Scientists race to understand COVID-19 building blocks and find a vaccine.  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus Be Cyber Vigilant and Avoid COVID-19 Scammers Article 5/5/2020 Soldier sitting in front of two computer monitors Take these steps to protect your personal information  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | Cybersecurity Awareness MHS expedites COVID-19 and flu test results Article 5/4/2020 Image of technician taking a nasal swab of a patient Find out how to access results and stay safe  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus Mobility Airmen conduct historic first aeromedical evacuation mission using Transport Isolation System Article 5/4/2020 Image of three people exiting an aircraft The TIS is an infectious disease containment unit designed to minimize risk to aircrew, medical attendants, and the airframe.  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement CDC maintains childhood immunization guidelines during COVID-19 Article 5/1/2020 A child receives a vaccine during a visit to the clinic. What you need to know about getting your child vaccinated  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Month of the Military Child Army veterinarians post FAQ for pet owners to Army Public Health Center COVID-19 website Article 4/30/2020 Woman laying on couch with her dog Studies are underway to investigate human to animal transmission in multiple animal species.  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | Mental Health Care COVID-19: Know symptoms and next steps to help ensure full recovery Article 4/30/2020 Soldier taking the temperature of another soldier Symptoms of COVID-19  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus BAMCheroes appreciation Video 4/29/2020 DHA Seal Our community has been a great source of support! Check out some of the positive feedback Brooke Army Medical Center has received for our incredible healthcare professionals.  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus Amid COVID-19, seasonal influenza still a threat to force readiness Article 4/29/2020 Hospital Corpsman administers a flu shot to a navy officer. New Southern Hemisphere flu vaccine available May 2020  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | Influenza Summary and Reports | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Influenza, Southern Hemisphere Defending the Homeland: WRNMMC on front line of COVID-19 war Article 4/29/2020 Image of soldiers and businessman in suit walking through an emergency shelter lined with beds and medical equipment For patient and staff safety, WRNMMC started restricted access control points March 12.  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | Military Hospitals and Clinics MHS pharmacies adapt services amid COVID-19 Article 4/28/2020 A pharmacy technician stands at a car window delivering medications while wearing a mask and gloves. Curbside, drive-thru, parking lobbies among solutions for prescription pickup  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | Public Health General’s visit punctuates engineering efforts converting arena to alternate care site Article 4/27/2020 Image of a contractor and a soldier looking at a blueprint The project cost $1.26 million and was completed in one week.  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus | Public Health Video Message from LTG Ronald J. Place, MD Video 4/24/2020 DHA Seal Thank you for continuing to do your part to help flatten the curve  Recommended Content:  Coronavirus << < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >>  Showing results 1 - 15Page 1 of 6 Health.mil News Articles Calendar of Events Gallery Infographics Photos Videos In the Spotlight Search News Search News Refine your search  Articles  Events  Infographics  Photos  Spotlights  Videos

From the front lines to the home front, Military Medicine is always ready

By Lt. Gen. Ron Place, Director, Defense Health Agency | April 1, 2020
Who would have imagined this? We’ve stopped almost everything else we were doing and turned our energies toward fighting this pandemic. As the specific impacts take shape within the United States, the Military Health System is surging forward, implementing standing plans and showing agility in responding to events that some believed were unthinkable even a few short months ago.
 

Military medical professionals take their oath at their graduation from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences during a ceremony in Washington, May 18, 2019. More than 200 USU military medical students and graduate nursing students will be graduating early in 2020 to support their colleagues in the U.S. military health system amid the global coronavirus pandemic. (DoD file photo)

200 new doctors, nurses to join military medical ranks early

By USU Staff | March 27, 2020
More than 200 military medical students and graduate nursing students from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, known as USU, will be graduating early to support their colleagues in the U.S. military health system amid the global coronavirus pandemic.

 

Air Force medics and health personnel around the globe are resolutely following and ensuring compliance with guidelines issued by the Department of Defense and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention according to Air Force Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg.

Air Force takes next steps to assure 'unblinking' operations
readiness and capabilities amid pandemic

By Lt. Gen Dorothy Hogg, US Air Force Surgeon General | March 23, 2020
How do you stand “shoulder to shoulder” in a time of COVID-19? For the United States Air and Space Forces, and indeed the entire United States military, this is no small question.

 

The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) is the central epidemiologic resource for the U.S. Armed Forces, conducting medical surveillance to protect those who serve our nation in uniform and allies who are critical to our national security interests. AFHSB provides timely, relevant, actionable and comprehensive health surveillance information to promote, maintain, and enhance the health of military and military-associated populations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Lipscomb)

How DHA monitors the spread of health outbreaks

By Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | March 13, 2020
The Defense Health Agency works as a combat support agency to the military services and Military Health System with epidemiology data that improves the health and readiness of all service members and their beneficiaries.
 

Lt. Col. John Merkley, Army Public Health Center, tests out a boothless audiometry headset system, one of four systems demonstrated by manufacturers during a workshop hosted by the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence at this year's National Hearing Conservation Association Conference. (HCE photo)

Innovative military hearing health programs showcased at national conference

By Military Health System Communications Office | March 5, 2020
Hearing standards for new Air Force recruits saved the military service millions of dollars, according to a presentation by the Department of Defense Hearing Center of Excellence at the annual National Hearing Conservation Association conference last month.